The Penis Problem

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The Penis Problem

Penis problem becomes a serious problem for men, it makes for them feel nervous and want to get that fixed A.S.A.P., right? Yet most guys who are diagnosed with erectile dysfunction (ED) don’t follow through with treating it, says research from Southern Illinois University School of Medicine.

Researchers analyzed 6.2 million health insurance claims for men who received an ED diagnosis, and discovered that only 25 percent filled a prescription for treatment during the 12-month study period.

PDE5 Inhibitors

If you’ve just been diagnosed with ED, you’ll probably be asked to try a PDE5 inhibitor—the first-line treatment option. In fact, 75 percent of the men in the study were prescribed these meds.

Alprostadil
Alprostadil

PDE5 inhibitors include options like sildenafil (Viagra), tadalafil (Cialis), and vardenafil (Levitra). Their effectiveness is about the same, and they work in the same way, says Dr. McVary. The drugs cause smooth muscles to relax and blood vessels to dilate, which helps you get an erection when you’re aroused.

Alprostadil

If you’ve failed pills—either they didn’t work for you, were too expensive, or you were bothered by the side effects—you may be asked to try alprostadil, a common second-line treatment, says Dr. McVary.

Alprostadil works by increasing blood flow and causing the smooth muscles to relax, which can help you get an erection. The drug can be given by an injection in your penis or a suppository in your penis’s opening. Sounds horrifying, right? “Men can be squeamish about the first shot, but then after that, they say it’s not that big of a deal,” says Dr. McVary.

pde5
PDE5 Inhibitors

Androgen Replacement Therapy

Also known as testosterone replacement, this treatment was prescribed to 31 percent of the men in the study. But it should only be used in guys who have bona fide low T, says Dr. McVary. That means blood levels below 300 ng/dl for those under 65.

Low levels of testosterone can cause decreased sex drive, low energy, and ED. Replacement therapy can help alleviate those symptoms. You might be prescribed injections, which you’d get every few weeks, or daily patches or gels.